Monday, August 27, 2012

Still the One

In 2005, I tried it for the first time.  I've made it every year since.  There were years that I dabbled with other sauces, but I always made a batch of this one.  I've mellowed out as a canner and now stick to what I know we love and will eat.  Those other recipes fell by the wayside and this is the only one that remains.


I found the recipe in Simply in Season Expanded Edition (World Community Cookbook).  It's called Basic Tomato Sauce but, as I've said before, I don't think it's an appropriate name.  Garden Tomato Sauce Extravaganza would be a more accurate name because of all the vegetables inside.  Here are the top reasons why I love it (and why you should love it, too).

1) It tastes great.  It has a very fresh garden taste even after sitting in the jar for months.  It's seasoned, but isn't so heavy-on-the-herbs that they mask the taste of the tomatoes.  It is tomato sauce after all.

2) You don't have to peel the tomatoes or put them through a food strainer!!  This is an incredible time-saver and uses the whole tomato (closer to the way God intended it to be eaten, in my opinion).  The tomatoes get chopped and cooked down in the pot.  An immersion blender (or regular blender) makes those skins disappear into the sauce- there is no evidence of them at all (by sight or by taste).

3) Because there is no peeling and no straining involved, it is a one-pot sauce.  This means less pots, pans and equipment to wash up.

4) It's loaded with vegetables- carrots, green peppers, onions, and garlic.  Your kids will have no idea they are eating so many veggies while they scarf down pizza or spaghetti.  A tablespoon of white vinegar is added to each pint jar just before filling it to ensure the proper acidity, so there is no need to worry about the additions of the other ingredients to the sauce.

5) Because of the addition of the vegetables and the fact that the tomatoes don't languish in scalding water (for peeling purposes), very little water/juice needs to be cooked off.  This means energy isn't wasted to cook the sauce down.

6) It works great for everything- pizza, spaghetti, lasagna, baked ziti, you name it.  There's no need to make separate sauces for separate dishes.  Unless you have plenty of time on your hands (which I don't).

So there you have it.  I know everyone is partial to their own sauce recipe, but in case you're in the market to try something new or like what you've read, I highly recommend this one (in case you missed my recommendation thus far :-)).

Three hundred eighty-five (385) pints later (since 2005), it's still the one.

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12 comments:

  1. Thank you for posting this - my goal for the morning was to find a good tomato sauce to try! :)

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  2. A HUGE Thank-You for this recipe! I've made 2 big batches this year, and am hoping to do several more, as long as my tomatoes keep coming.

    My picky 5 year-old helped me make and can a batch, and wanted to taste it too...he has NEVER eaten a tomatoe....he tasted the sauce and exclaimed, "Mmmmm, that is SO good Mommy" and asked for and ate an entire bowl full of plain sauce!

    So good and easy to make! (I did double the onion & garlic :)

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  3. Thanks so much for this post. I made 2 batches this AM, one pureed and one chunky. I am wondering if in my next 5-10 batches I could add diced up zucchini and eggplant. Do you have any advice. Great recipes by the way!

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    Replies
    1. I'm so glad you're pleased with the recipe! I, personally, would hesitate to add additional vegetables without cutting back on some of the others to keep the general equivalent for vinegar/acidity purposes. Also, I have never canned anything with zucchini or eggplant in it- I wonder if it would be safer to can that version with a pressure canner. Just my cautious two cents:-). (This recipe was tried/tested and evaluated by knowledgeable food folks for the cookbook Simply In Season so I can only vouch for the particular recipe above). Hope this helps:-).

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  4. It sure does! THanks so much. I will stick with the basic recipe. I just diced up my zucchinis, eggplants and peppers, mixed them together and froze them. I am greatful for the help, on my first time canning tomato sauce.

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  5. I should have waited ,I could have got more nutrition in for my buck. and all that blanching I did!but than ,I freeze ,I don't can.I'm afraid of botulism.

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  6. You make me wish I had some tomatoes to can....so sad! I'm so glad you found the *perfect* sauce! It's so satisfying to land on a perfect recipe, isn't it? :)

    Blessings to you my friend!
    Camille

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  7. Great recipe! I just made my first batch this afternoon. My daughter taste tested for me on some pasta she was making. She thought it was great. I plan on picking some more tomatoes this weekend and making a couple more batches. Is it ok to just double the batch, or should I make single batches?

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    Replies
    1. When I make this sauce, I times the recipe by 8. That's all that will fit in my large sauce pot. It multiplies just fine, although I do find I need to taste test to get it seasoned right. It gives me 25 pints. So, to answer your question, double away!:-).

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  8. This is the second summer we have made this sauce and we love it! We have over 20 pints and 13 quarts in the pantry now and are looking forward to that fresh garden flavor all year long. (And I made a quart and froze it with meatballs to take over to your brother and sister-in-law since they'll be busy with their new baby!)

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  9. This is the first year I had enough tomotoes to do anything with besides just eat. I've made three batches of this sauce and we've had it in stromboli, lasagna, and with spaghetti. It is fabulous! Thank you! I was scared away from so many sauce recipes by the blanching and peeling--that takes too much time and seems like a waste. The blender makes this sauce perfect. Thank you for all your tips and recipes. I really enjoy your blog, even though I don't think I have ever commented before. So many of your recipes have become regulars for my family.

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